Category Archives: inspiration

The Diabetic Educator …for a friday read :):)


What does an educator do? Diabetes is a multisystem disease affecting most organs in the body. Managing diabetes holistically in a team means each member focuses on their area of expertise.

For the educator this is explaining how insulins work, how the different oral meds work, what sugars should and could be at different times of the day, dangers of hypos and highs, how to inject, how to test etc in the newly diagnosed.

One very important aspect is setting goals around targets like A1c as well as variability, post meal values etc as well as any other goals regarding diabetes like exercise, staving off burn out and depression and a whole host of possible goals.

The educator in many respects is a co-ordinator or conductor of the processes and aids very much with direction and the trajectory of the diabetic path.

This critical role actually can make the difference in getting to target as well as staying at target which translates to less health expenditure downstream as well as healthier functioning patients with quality of life.

Educators are core to diabetes management top of the range.

MOVE – Dr Lee THE GP …0832898351


Dr Lee is moving to The Ellenbird in hilton – 2 Quarry road, New phone number : 0832898351, we are relinquishing telkom. We have to pay them 30k to go away. And trust me this is the “cheap” option. IN a nutshell, don’t sign a contract with telkom.

NUFF said!

Fran Steart, Michele Albets, Fiona McRimmon and Elze Scheepers will join us at the Ellen Bird. Fran and Michele are dieticians specialising in diabetes and eating disorders. Fiona is a life coach and Elze is a laser and PRP practitioner.

Pop in – coffee at the coffee shop, gifts and the gift shop and medical help including speech therapy etc all available.

AN idea of the feeling you get at our new practice :

Myths around diabetes


November is diabetes month – awareness around what it is and treatment etc. There is actually quite a lot of strange information that circulates, “fake-news” so to speak regarding diabetes at large.

So let’s dispel some myths.

1.) Diabetes is caused by poor diet : firstly type 1 has nothing to do with diet and is bad luck essentially. It seems to be an auto-immune disease and essentially destroys the b cells of the pancreas creating an absolute lack of insulin.

Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle related as well as genetic disease and even more complex in nature.

Insulin resistance is a condition more and more prevalent due to lifestyle as well as stress – a big factor. More about this another time.

2.) IF you eat properly you will get better : well firstly type 1 diabetes, without insulin – you die, children in the era before 1921 died. Only since 1921 and Banting and Best’s discovery do type 1 ‘s survive with normal life expectancies.

Concerning type 2 diet is critical and important (as it is with type 1) carbs are key and obviously healthy eating and exercising are key but eating 100% correctly will unfortunately not bring back b cells that have died.

3.) Type 1 diabetics should never eat carbs : whilst one should be mindful of the type and quantity of carb and dose the insulin accordingly it is by no means advised that type 1’s exclude all carbs. This is a tricky one and best discussed in consultation with a dietician.

 

Your sugars and your holidays


holidaysHow does one approach glucose control during the holidays?

Holidays are generally a time where we relax and let our hair down a bit more than at other times. Included in this are dietary relaxations like consuming more refined sugar than normal as well as alcohol in slightly greater amounts and strengths, depending on your preference and age. Also for some it may include more than normal outdoor activity and exercise.

All of these have repercussions for glucose levels.

So, obviously each person has an entirely unique set of circumstances as well as metabolism but roughly speaking here are some basic holiday guidelines.

If you are a type 1 and injecting insulins and testing :

1.) Consider testing your sugar more often if you are exercising more and possibly feeling hypo.

2.) Consider adjusting your insulin dose at meals with more carbs and simple carbs than you are used to (perhaps go through your dietician and doctor re this).

3.) Understand that if you drink a lot and sleep in the next morning this is dangerous and alcohol will at first raise your sugars and then after about 10-12 hours drop your sugars, so watch out for a “missed” hypo and make sure you tag a mate to check on you at least.

4.) If you are snacking and the carb count is more than 10-15 g of carbs you may need to bolus for this kind of snack in order to keep your sugars stable but it really depends on a number of factors other than just this.

5.) the weather plays a bigger role than you think, some people will go either high or low depending on very hot or very cold conditions so try to understand your body and rather pre-empt the rise or fall or at least be vigilant and test more often.

6.) consider wearing a type of medic alert bracelet in case of unconsciousness – it may save your life.

For type 2 diabetics on oral agents only or have additional insulin injections

1.) Most importantly holidays can mean massive weight gain, and this is very bad and hard to get rid of in the long run. Pre-empt this by seeing a dietician who could give you guidelines on how to cheat without too much weight gain. Also see it as a challenge to maintain your weight rather than a punishment and reward yourself with things other than the wrong food on the holidays. Set incentives and be kind to yourself with spoilers that blow your hair back and don’t put weight on.

2.) Make sure that you have enough medication and testing strips for the time that you are away as well as some back-up diabetes supplies.

3.) Know what carbs are and how they affect your sugars and plan accordingly.

4.) Know the carb content of the alcohol you are drinking and factor it into the daily calculation of insulin (if injecting) as well as the total effect of the alcohol and your activities (physical) or not.

5.) Try to see the holiday as an opportunity for increased movement -exercise in many different forms and find one that works for you, start the routine on holiday.

6.) Experiment with different healthy food and take mental note of how you feel and what it does to your sugars.

We all need a break, a re-set and a proper unwind. So most of all give yourself the mental Β “space” and time you need to do just this. Planning for your holiday around your diabetes will aid in enjoying this time more and taking stress out of certain situations.

There are always healthcare professionals on duty, know the nearest casualty location and telephone numbers as well as ambulance and other emergency numbers before leaving home.

Celebrate and live each minute


Our time on earth is limited by a number none of us know. The quality that we experience depends almost entirely on us – each one, in our own capacity.

Life is very short for some and interminably long for others. The enigma is that there is no way of knowing.

Where does that leave us each, individually?

Life is a strange bag of tricks and boils down to little more that about 40-60 years on average of a daily slog : waking, working, paying for things, sleeping. And yet it can be so much more. It can be.

It depends entirely on your own self. The quality of each minute. The minutes add up and create memories. But essentially if you are not present in the present and enjoying that very minute wholeheartedly it may be a wasted minute, hour, life.

I wish we knew in a way. The hours we each had and the moments that we should make count.

But we don’t.

Perhaps only when you lose a loved one do you re-evalute life on a minute to minute basis.

Today actually counts for more than you think and if you understand that in the realm of time and space we are each such a small inconsequent speck that may or may not live another day, surely it’s worth making this very minute worth it.

Sorrow and sadness fill my being for the loss of a life so huge at some moments and so full of the very essence of life. He lived indeed and took the time to make it special. I so hope that one day I will understand the reason we have a this life and a “death” or after life. I certainly don’t today.

Josef Pilates – unconventional response


I do just love the story of this man, born in Germany to a father of greek descent. He had “healthy” parents who got the flame kindled for what was to come. He was a sickly child with many obstacles to overcome and born into the world at a challenging time. He was a circus performer who toured England and somehow also got involved in training the scotland yard police in physical training.

When the war broke out he was “interned” on the isle of man due to being german (first world war). It was during this time that he helped prisoners of war who were bedridden to “exercise” by “creating” novel equipment so that they could exercise in bed.

He was a war hero and asked by the kaiser to train german troops but declined the offer and rather went across to America to start a new life (and not partake in world war 2).

In Manhatten he started a “contrology” studio in the same building as some dance studios and the rest is largely history.

I find it fascinating that someone dealt a fairly difficult hand of cards came up so trumps with this “new” form of exercise that now helps millions of people across the globe.

If you have not tried pilates do it today : mind body soul invigoration!

don’t just sit there – phone around, google and go

Diabetes “connect” – meet the team


Last chance to book for meet the team πŸ˜‰

WE will be available on the 15 March 2017 for any one interested to meet the team. We will serve a “healthy” treat and explain how we approach diabetes and chronic disease management from a team point of view.

Please do RSVP : 033 3431826

The event will kick off at 530 sharp and end at 630 and children are welcome – we will have some games in the garden for them.

Innate Diabetes Hilton is situated at 26 hilton avenue and we aim to provide a team for all your diabetes needs : GP with a diploma in diabetes and pump centre, dietician with a passion for diabetes, podiatrist, diabetes educator as well as the bonus of 2 beauticians who do a whole range of wonderful treatments. We also have and educational psychologist as well as a psychologist on site and a life coach who specialises in addictions and relationship difficulties.

Come and meet the team πŸ™‚

Nourish and flourish


A lovely home cooked meal that is diabetic friendly and low in carbs.

Chicken moussaka : divine tender chicken and bacon with aubergine smothered in a cheesy herbed sauce

Thai chicken curry : mild thai curry with julienne veggies in a coconut sauce

Melanzane Parmigiana : roast aubergine with a slow-cooked delicious tomato parmesan and mozzarella cheese sauce

Cottage Pie : savoury mince with creamy sweet potato and butternut mash

singles, doubles and 4 portions available in store : 26 hilton avenue

goodfoodgoodfood2

Eat healthy live long and well!

 

Diabetes – the future


With great excitement I look forward to 2016 and new developments in Diabetes worldwide and in South Africa. We are delighted to be adding to this offering a multi-disciplinary and integrated medicine approach right here at 26 Hilton avenue in January 2016.

As a team of health care practitioners we firmly believe that diabetes requires the skill of a multi-disciplinary team that targets the diabetes disease from all angles, all organs as well as from head to toe. We will be providing this range of care in very specialised packages (or as individual consults) targeting : pre diabetes, type 2 and type 1 in a very specific to disease fashion. We also aim to cover women’s health issues in the same fashion as well as patients who are just generally performing below par.

In terms of what is available to diabetics in 2016 : brand new medicines, combinations of medicines, new strategies which combine using techology with your health care practitioners for closer and more meaningful follow-up, new pump therapy, possibly islet cell transplant roll out mostly overseas but keep your eyes peeled for this amazing “cure” for type 1.

As a team we promise to provide up to date care as well as treat each individual to target with a patient-centered plan with patient input as a major part of the strategy.

We will be partnering with some awesome chefs πŸ˜‰ and making diabetes your best friend.

Do you know that if you take care of your diabetes you will outlive and outlive in a healthy fashion your friend who is not diabetic?dex sensor

dexcom2

almost all above

seb1

SEbastian Sasseville, an inspirational diabetic

gila1

A “learned” response


How does one overcome adversity? I watched a brilliant little youtube clip by a guy with type 1 diabetes who has done incredible things and thanks his diabetes for his “gift” of “not being able to choose” the disease and having to learn how to cope.

What I loved most about his clip was the fact that he aims to ” have his favourite song playing” – you probably have Β to watch it to understand – but to be inspired on an ongoing basis. The “success” so to speak is shortlived and a moment, but the journey is where you “perform” and get swept up and sweep others up.

He tries to impart how to “dance” with your obstacle and yield in a sense and the power that then comes from that as opposed to fighting the diagnosis/obstacle.

IT’s inspirational and worth a watch. http://www.sebinspires.com, also on YOU tube : Sebastian Sasseville

SEbastian Sasseville, an inspirational diabetic

SEbastian Sasseville, an inspirational diabetic

How could this Not be inspiring ?

How could this Not be inspiring ?;)

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