Monthly Archives: March 2017

Surgery as a patient


The hardest 2 things I have ever had to do is deliver 2 babies. Yes I did do it naturally and perhaps at the age of 37 and 39 I should have listened to the wise advice of so many colleagues and had 2 planned caesars. I wanted the very best for the two angels that I had waited so many years for and I believed going through the birth canal was that. What I did not realise is what it would take out of and from me.

Delivering a child naturally comes with a lot of waiting (patience has never been my forte). It then involves an “older” body “co-operating” with the birth process. If that had all happened “naturally” I guess it may have been different. My body needed help and in the second birth it needed an ocean of a medication called oxytocin (syntocinon). This very large dose into my system helped my 39 year old uterus contract in order to deliver one 3.5 kg baby.

I will keep you in a bit of suspense, like a bit of a thriller novel.

I have just (last friday) had surgery – 4 years after my precious second child’s birth. It was an operation to effectively remove my uterus. This organ that has caused a fair amount of poor quality of life. The surgeon was extremely happy with his operation (they usually are) and presented me with a photo of the wretched organ and great news that it had gone swimmingly.

Wind back 4 years. I had just delivered a baby at around 3 am in the morning. The team were tired. God knows they had had me in chunks. No nursing staff are ever delighted to “nurse” a lady doctor – goes against many grains. I was lying in a lot of blood and had already started to bleed. I was in a fair amount of pain considering I had already delivered a child. The pain escalated, the nausea escalated, the bleeding escalated. I called for help so to speak and was told to shut up and sleep (in my own blood) they had really had enough of me for one night. I tried again. I phoned a friend – no one was up at 4 am. I tried my husband – his phone was off – he was trying to sleep after a hell of a night. I phoned the neighbour and asked him to wake my husband and come to the hospital.

AT one point I left my body and watched mayhem from above.

I woke up – well “arrived” back in my body about 2 days later having been taken to theatre, resuscitated, transfused etc. They never did figure out what was causing my pain 4 years ago. I started on a long journey of recovery mentally, physically and emotionally.

The surgeon showed me (this last saturday)

what happened – my uterus had ruptured and well lets just say the human body is an amazing thing.

I do certainly wish that it had been discovered 4 years ago for a few reasons. The very first and most important being my marriage which suffered greatly for the rupture. The second being the suffering that could so easily have been avoided. I can actually deal with a fair amount (though I do believe my pain threshold is useless), but my wish would be for another women to not have to go through the journey I have travelled. The third being the faith I have lost in my own “kind”. Never did I think it possible to be treated the way I was that night or on 3 occasions where all I really wanted was an apology from the midwife and all staff closed rank and called me something close to a lunatic and just bloody well get over this and move on.

Well I can now. Move on.

I can also say that a hysterectomy is a relative walk in the park. Almost a non-event. Yes I had pain post-op and yes I required the strong stuff. But 2 days later I was not on anything for pain and today I feel like I could run a marathon (I won’t for all those urging me to rest).

Life is an interesting journey and some of the suffering actually helps create focus and for that I am grateful. The most awesome part is just beginning – a journey with Dave and my two girls.

Josef Pilates – unconventional response


I do just love the story of this man, born in Germany to a father of greek descent. He had “healthy” parents who got the flame kindled for what was to come. He was a sickly child with many obstacles to overcome and born into the world at a challenging time. He was a circus performer who toured England and somehow also got involved in training the scotland yard police in physical training.

When the war broke out he was “interned” on the isle of man due to being german (first world war). It was during this time that he helped prisoners of war who were bedridden to “exercise” by “creating” novel equipment so that they could exercise in bed.

He was a war hero and asked by the kaiser to train german troops but declined the offer and rather went across to America to start a new life (and not partake in world war 2).

In Manhatten he started a “contrology” studio in the same building as some dance studios and the rest is largely history.

I find it fascinating that someone dealt a fairly difficult hand of cards came up so trumps with this “new” form of exercise that now helps millions of people across the globe.

If you have not tried pilates do it today : mind body soul invigoration!

don’t just sit there – phone around, google and go

Diabetes “connect” – meet the team


Last chance to book for meet the team 😉

WE will be available on the 15 March 2017 for any one interested to meet the team. We will serve a “healthy” treat and explain how we approach diabetes and chronic disease management from a team point of view.

Please do RSVP : 033 3431826

The event will kick off at 530 sharp and end at 630 and children are welcome – we will have some games in the garden for them.

Innate Diabetes Hilton is situated at 26 hilton avenue and we aim to provide a team for all your diabetes needs : GP with a diploma in diabetes and pump centre, dietician with a passion for diabetes, podiatrist, diabetes educator as well as the bonus of 2 beauticians who do a whole range of wonderful treatments. We also have and educational psychologist as well as a psychologist on site and a life coach who specialises in addictions and relationship difficulties.

Come and meet the team 🙂